Promoting Coexistence
Florida Panther,  © SuperStock
Grizzly Bear, © Ray Rafiti

Overview

Americans are fortunate to have an impressive diversity of wildlife sharing the land, water, and sky with us. But as people have moved into undeveloped areas, and climate change has caused wildlife habitat to shift, conflicts with wild animals have increased.

Often, when wild animals are seen as a threat or a nuisance, they are simply killed. This approach has led to the decline of species in the past – particularly large native predators like wolves and bears who play critical roles in creating healthier ecosystems that benefit us all. Finding ways to prevent conflicts without lethal control is in the best interest of wildlife and humans alike.

Our experts have years of experience and promoting and implementing effective nonlethal coexistence tools and strategies. We help individuals, communities, and state and local agencies implement nonlethal measures that allow them to coexist peacefully with native wildlife.

More on Promoting Coexistence: Advancing Coexistence Policies »

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Fact Sheet
Prairie dogs are burrowing rodents that live in large colonies in the grasslands of central and western North America.
Gray Wolf, © Dawn Hammond
Fact Sheet
The wolf is the largest member of the canine family. Gray wolves range in color from grizzled gray or black to all-white. As the ancestor of the domestic dog, the gray wolf resembles German shepherds or malamutes.
Where We Work
Our Southwest team works to protect rare and threatened species like Mexican wolves, jaguars and ocelots.