Defenders Magazine

Fall 2011

Volume 86, Issue 4

Feature

“They’ve just rebelled,” breaks the garbled voice over the radio, barely audible amid the deafening tha tha tha tha chugging of the cherry-red helicopter cresting over the treetops. Its pilot and a handful of Montana government officials on horseback are marshalling hundreds of wild bison back into Yellowstone National Park in an annual drive called hazing. In the steady march over barely green sedges and bluebunch wheatgrass that began six hours ago at sunrise, two mothers with a calf apiece have had enough bullying and bolt.

Articles

In a huge victory in July 2011, wildlife champions on both sides of the aisle in the House of Representatives struck down the so-called “extinction rider” by a vote of 224 to 202, with 37 House Republicans supporting the measure.
For the second year in a row, Defenders and our conservation partners stepped up to help save hundreds of prairie dogs at the edge of Thunder Basin National Grassland in eastern Wyoming.
The dead and stranded sea turtles began washing up on Gulf Coast beaches last year. There were so many that the National Marine Fisheries Service investigated, finding both the BP Gulf oil disaster and shrimp trawling were likely to blame.
Coexistence is the order of the day in Oregon, thanks to months of discussions among Defenders of Wildlife, Oregon wildlife officials, the governor’s office and the ranching community. A livestock compensation and wolf coexistence bill unanimously passed the state House and Senate and was signed into law by Gov. John Kitzhaber in August.
Wolves in the West fan some people’s passions and fuel other people’s rage. The one thing they can’t seem to do is stay out of the crosshairs.
In recent years, the aquarium trade has decimated the wild population, which had declined by almost half in the last decade in areas still open to collection.
Weighing in at up to 60 tons, bowhead whales hold the record for the biggest mouth of any living animal and they have the densest blubber, measuring up to 2-feet thick.