Defenders in California

Resources

Defenders Web Pages

Fact Sheets

Sea Otter

Sharks

Defenders Blog

California Posts

Defenders Publications (PDF)

Feeling the Heat: Impacts of Global Warming on California's Wildlife
This 4-page fact sheet provides detailed information about the impacts of global warming on specific California species and habitats and what you can do to help wildlife adapt and survive global warming.

Economic Oasis: Revealing the True Value of the Mojave Desert
Read this 32-page Defenders report that contains many photos and facts to help explain the economic values of our ecologically and culturally rich California desert lands.

An Economic Analysis of the Benefits of Habitat Conservation on California Rangelands
This report investigates the public and private economic benefits associated with the conservation of wildlife habitat and other natural resources on rangelands in California’s Central Valley.

Payments for Ecosystem Services: A California Rancher Perspective
This report presents the results of a survey of California ranchers’ perspectives, knowledge, and preferences for current and prospective resource conservation programs based on incentives for conserving or restoring ecosystem services.

External Websites

California Department of Fish and Game

California Fish and Game Commission

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific Southwest Region

U.S. Forest Service, Region 5

U.S. Bureau of Land Management, California State Office

U.S. Bureau of Land Management, California Desert District

Sierra Forest Legacy

Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project

More on Defenders in California: Contact the Defenders California Office »

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Grizzly Bear, © Ray Rafiti
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Fact Sheet
Sharks (superorder Selachimorpha) belong to a family of fish that have skeletons made of cartilage, a tissue more flexible and lighter than bone. Shark bodies are rounded and tapering at the ends. They breathe through a series of five to seven gill slits located on either side of their bodies.