Fact Sheet
Burrowing Owl

Basic Facts About Burrowing Owls

Burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) are so named because they live underground in burrows that have been dug out by small mammals like ground squirrels and prairie dogs. They are covered in brown spotted feathers and have long legs. They also sport distinctive white “eyebrows” above bright yellow eyes. They are one of the smallest owls in North America.

Diet

Burrowing owls eat small mammals such as moles and mice during late spring and early summer. Later they switch to insects, especially grasshoppers and beetles. Burrowing owls are also known to eat birds, amphibians and reptiles.

Population

Current burrowing owl population estimates are not well known but trend data suggests significant declines across their range. Most recent official estimates place them at less than 10,000 breeding pairs.

Range

Burrowing owls are distributed from the Mississippi to the Pacific and from the Canadian prairie provinces into South America. They are also found in Florida and the Caribbean islands. Burrowing owls have disappeared from much of their historic range.

Behavior

Unlike other owls, burrowing owls are active during the day, especially in the spring when they gather food for their large broods. This species of owl prefers open areas with low ground cover. They can often be found perching near their burrow on fence posts and trees.

Burrowing owls make a tremulous chuckling or chattering call. They also bob their heads to express excitement or distress.

Burrowing owls often nest in loose colonies about 100 yards apart.

During the nesting season, burrowing owls will collect a wide variety of materials to line their nest, some of which are left around the entrance to the burrow. The most common material is mammal dung, usually from cattle. At one time it was incorrectly thought that the dung helped to mask the scent of the juvenile owls, but researchers now believe the dung helps to control the microclimate inside the burrow and to attract insects, which the owls may eat.

Did You Know?

When alarmed, young birds will make a hissing call that sounds like a rattlesnake.

Reproduction

Mating Season: Early spring.
Gestation: 28 days.
Clutch size: 3-12 eggs.
The young owls begin appearing at the burrow’s entrance two weeks after hatching and leave the nest to hunt for insects on their own after about 45 days. The chicks can fly well at 6 weeks old.

More on Burrowing Owl: Threats to Burrowing Owls »

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Gopher tortoise, © Cindy McIntyre
Fact Sheet
Gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) are so named because of their ability to dig large, deep burrows.
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