Animal Fact Sheets

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alligator, © Dolores Rose
The American alligator is the largest reptile in North America. It has a large, dark (usually black), slightly rounded body and thick limbs. Unlike the crocodile, the alligator has a broad head.
With a coat that changes color and thick fur even on their paws, Arctic foxes are well adapted to their habitat’s extreme cold.
The bald eagle is the only eagle unique to North America. Its distinctive brown body and white head and tail make it easy to identify even from a distance.
Northern long-eared bat, © Steven Thomas/NPS
Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. With extremely elongated fingers and a wing membrane stretched between, the bat’s wing anatomically resembles the human hand.
Adult beluga whales are easily distinguished by their pure white skin, their small size and their lack of dorsal fin. The beluga has a broad and rounded head and a large forehead.
When competing for ewes, rams charge each other at more than 20 miles per hour.
Wild bison are making a small comeback, but they need more room to roam.
The American black bear is the smallest of the three bears species found in North America, and are found only in North America. Black bears have short, non-retractable claws that give them an excellent tree-climbing ability.
The endangered black-footed ferret is a member of the weasel family. It is the only ferret native to North America - the domestic ferret is a different species of European origin and has been domesticated for hundreds of years - and has a tan body with black legs and feet, a black tip on the tail and a black mask.
The most common wildcat in North America, the bobcat is named for its short, bobbed tail. They are medium-sized cats and are slightly smaller but similar in appearance to their cousin, the lynx. Their coats vary in color from shades of beige to brown fur with spotted or lined markings in dark brown or black.

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