Jonathan Proctor

Printer-friendly version
Rockies and Plains Program Director
(720) 943-0451

Jonathan Proctor, Northern Rockies Representative

Areas of Expertise: Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, bison, black-footed ferrets, grizzly bears, prairie dogs, swift fox, wolverines, wolves

Jonathan joined Defenders in 2005. As the Rockies and Plains program director, he directs Defenders’ work in these two regions and oversees the field staff in Montana and Colorado. Jonathan has worked in wildlife and wilderness conservation since 1990. Prior to joining Defenders, he worked as a wilderness ranger with the U.S. Forest Service in Oregon and Montana from 1990 to 1997, and for Predator Conservation Alliance in Montana and Colorado from 1997 to 2005. He joined Defenders in 2005 and opened a new field office in Denver to focus on Southern Rockies and Great Plains wildlife. In 2008 he moved to our Missoula field office to focus on grizzly bears, bison, black-footed ferrets and other species conservation efforts in the Northern Rockies and Plains. In 2013 Jonathan moved back to Denver to open a new Rockies and Plains office and to expand Defenders’ work throughout these two regions. Jonathan is a co-founder and former coordinator of the Northern Plains Conservation Network, a coalition of conservation organizations and tribes working to restore of the region’s natural heritage. He is also a co-founder and advisory board member of the Prairie Dog Coalition, a project of the Humane Society of the United States. He is co-author of Ocean of Grass, an ecoregion assessment of the Northern Great Plains, as well as four publications on prairie dogs. Jonathan received a B.A. in Geography from Wittenberg University and a M.S. in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana.

You may also be interested in:

Fact Sheet
Called "skunk bear" by the Blackfeet Indians, the wolverine is the largest terrestrial member of the weasel family. It has a broad head, small eyes and short rounded ears.
The latest articles about wildlife issues that may be of interest to those in the press.
Defenders in Action
Bears die when they get into trouble with people’s garbage, livestock, when they are hit by cars and trains or illegally killed. By preventing these conflicts we can keep bears alive and on the road to recovery.