Senate Passes $50 Billion Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Bill

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WASHINGTON-The Senate passed the Hurricane Sandy supplemental bill yesterday in a historic step towards addressing climate adaptation. The $50 billion bill includes provisions for flood-reducing projects, repairs at national parks and wildlife refuges, and programs to increase the resiliency of coastal habitat and infrastructure in the face of future storms.

Statement from Defenders of Wildlife President Jamie Rappaport Clark:

“We’re glad to see that Congress recognizes the important role that the natural environment plays in preventing and reducing damage from weather disasters. Restoring wetlands and wildlife habitat is a safety measure for communities, wildlife and our environment.

“We can now begin the work of rebuilding and restoring communities and natural areas alike. In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, it’s clear that it’s time to change the way we respond to severe storms and this new legislation is a great start. Climate change is real and is here. We will continue to see worsening storms, floods, fires and droughts. We have to begin preparing for these climate-driven impacts and ensure that wildlife and intact ecosystems are included in our disaster response measures.”

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Contact:

Haley McKey, hmckey@defenders.org, (202) 772-0247

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With more than 1 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit defenders.org and follow us on Twitter @DefendersNews.

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