Defenders Magazine

Winter 2011

Volume 86, Issue 1

Feature

Bob Chastain is standing calf-deep in the tumbling waters of the San Antonio River in eastern Panama, staring intently at the rocky banks and mossy boulders. It’s an overcast morning in late June, and the leaves of the tropical plants above are still dripping from an early shower. Here, on the flanks of auspiciously named Cerro Sapo (Toad Mountain), in a remote part of Darien National Park, Chastain and a group of other biologists are stalking some small, slippery creatures.

Articles

Firm footing is hard to find for Mexican wolves in the American Southwest
Vaccinating prairie dogs may be the key to saving rare black-footed ferrets
There’s a saying in politics that dates at least to the French Revolution, to the effect that the public gets the government it deserves.
A preternatural quiet has fallen over the land. On this cold snap of a February day, even exhaled air is quickly stilled, flash-frozen into ice crystals. Wind-whipped snow rests in six-foot-high banks that stretch for miles along Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay.
Global climate change could spell disaster for some South American birds as more rain and warmer temperatures cause the populations of parasites that plague them to explode.
With all-too-frequent reports of rare panthers killed on roads as their habitat is lost to development, Florida’s big cats are in urgent need of help. Enter the idea to expand the boundaries of the 26,000-acre Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge.
Icons of the West, bison are as American as apple pie and the 4th of July. But with only one genetically pure wild bison herd left—the approximately 3,000-strong Yellowstone National Park herd—the future for these wild animals is in doubt.
The oil that bled into the Gulf of Mexico for months last year and caused the death of thousands of animals continues to impact coastal communities and natural habitats.
When wolves began returning to the Northern Rockies more than two decades ago, Defenders pioneered a program to compensate ranchers for livestock lost to the imperiled animals—a crucial foundation for building rancher tolerance for wolves.
Defenders has long worked to make residents in the West and Alaska more bear aware.
Swift and silent as the falling snow, these adeptly named big cats stalk wild sheep, goats and other mountain mammals across some of Central Asia’s rockiest terrain.