Fact Sheet
Gray Wolf
Gray Wolf, © Bruce Faanes
Gray Wolf, © Dawn Hammond

What Defenders Is Doing to Help Gray Wolves

For decades, Defenders has been a leader in promoting wolf recovery throughout their natural ranges.

We were one of the driving forces behind their successful reintroduction in 1995 and 1996 into the Northern Rockies and greater Yellowstone region and led the way to reintroduce wolves to the Southwest in 1998.

Unfortunately, wolves today continue to face threats to their survival and Defenders continues to work on the ground, in the courts, and in state and federal legislatures to give America's wolves a lasting future.

Ensuring a Lasting Future for Gray Wolves >>
As advocates for wolves, Defenders is actively challenging state wildlife agencies and legislatures on reckless wolf management policies , exposing threats to wolves to help ensure a long-term future of a healthy, sustainable wolf population.

Helping Ranchers Coexist with Wolves >>
Defenders has pioneered practical solutions to help livestock and wolves coexist on the same landscape. We’re working with ranchers across the West to develop nonlethal deterrents, better animal husbandry practices, and other innovative tools that minimize conflict and build social acceptance for wolves.

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The latest articles about wildlife issues that may be of interest to those in the press.
In the Magazine
The conservation outlook in the Senate has improved, but we still have a House leadership that is quite hostile to environmental programs.
Polar bear, © Tom Schneider
In the Magazine
Coexistence is the order of the day in Oregon, thanks to months of discussions among Defenders of Wildlife, Oregon wildlife officials, the governor’s office and the ranching community. A livestock compensation and wolf coexistence bill unanimously passed the state House and Senate and was signed into law by Gov. John Kitzhaber in August.