Animal Fact Sheets

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Polar Bears, © Joan Robins
Often referred to as the largest land carnivores in the world, polar bears are actually marine mammals, spending much of their time on Arctic sea ice hundreds of miles from land.
Prairie dogs are burrowing rodents that live in large colonies in the grasslands of central and western North America.
A smaller cousin of the gray wolf, red wolves are extremely rare, with just about 100 left in the wild.
Rhinoceroses the largest land mammals after the elephant. There are five species of rhinos, two African and three Asian. The African species are the white and black rhinoceroses. Both species have two horns. Asian rhinos include the Indian (or great one-horned rhinoceros) and the Javan, each with one horn, and the Sumatran, which has two.
Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are a striking and charismatic bird that derives their name, food and shelter from the sagebrush on which they depend. Both males and females are a mottled, brownish-gray.
Salmon is the common name for fish in the order Salmoniformes. They live in the northern Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and are anadromous, which means most types of salmon are born in fresh water, migrate to the sea, and return to freshwater to reproduce, or "spawn."
The tiny and secretive San Joaquin kit fox is one of the most endangered animals in California.
Sea otters have the densest fur in the animal kingdom, ranging from 250,000 to a million hairs per square inch, which insulates them and maintains warmth. Unlike other marine mammals, the sea otter does not have a layer of blubber (fat) to help keep it warm.
Sea Turtle, © Christina Albright-Mundy
Sea turtles are one of the Earth's most ancient creatures. The seven species that can be found today have been around for 110 million years, since the time of the dinosaurs.
Sharks (superorder Selachimorpha) belong to a family of fish that have skeletons made of cartilage, a tissue more flexible and lighter than bone. Shark bodies are rounded and tapering at the ends. They breathe through a series of five to seven gill slits located on either side of their bodies.