Video: Climate Change and Tidal Marshes

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East coast tidal marshes, like those surrounding the Chesapeake Bay, are at risk of being completely devastated by rising sea levels due to climate change. Many endangered bird species, like the saltmarsh sparrow and the clapper rail, depend on these marshes. Defenders of Wildlife is working with the Audubon Society and Lower Shore Land Trust to develop plans to protect these ecosystems.

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