Publications

Defenders of Wildlife produces many reports, fact sheets, tip sheets and other types of publications.

Use the dropdown boxes below to find publications related to specific animals, conservation issues, and regions.

Canada Lynx, © Jean Pierre Grosemans
The guide, the second in our series on wildlife conservation under the Forest Service’s 2012 Planning Rule, is designed to help people develop effective connectivity conservation strategies in forest plans. The Planning for Connectivity guide is intended to be used in tandem with the more comprehensive Planning for Diversity guide.
Located on the tip of the Alaska Peninsula, Izembek National Wildlife Refuge is internationally recognized as an important wetland, protected as a wildlife refuge and designated as a wilderness area. It’s one of Alaska’s most ecologically diverse wildlife refuges, with lagoons, tundra and stunning mountain peaks.
forest, © Lindsay Kaun
Planning for Diversity is a guide to national forest planning to conserve America’s wildlife. The guide provides a roadmap and recommendations for people working on national forest plan revisions and navigating the complex diversity requirements of the new Forest Service planning regulations.
The 10 guiding principles for ecosystem services assessments are designed to encourage thorough assessments that take into consideration ecological, social, and economic values—an interdisciplinary approach that examines interdependent relationships.
This paper offers a framework for use by public and private entities who manage natural resources. It focuses on the maintenance and restoration of ecological integrity to help ensure that natural systems continue to provide intrinsic value and benefits to human communities.
Defenders of Wildlife reviewed 11 recent reports on climate science, impacts and vulnerability of terrestrial, freshwater and marine wildlife and habitats. Here, we have compiled the key findings for U.S. Forest Service leaders and staff and members of the public interested in helping vulnerable species and landscapes survive the changes ahead.
Public and private organizations have become increasingly interested in measuring the benefits that nature provides, such as clean drinking water, fertile soil, and habitat and livelihoods for people and other species. The 10 guiding principles for ecosystem services assessments are designed to encourage thorough assessments that take into consideration ecological, social, and economic values—an interdisciplinary approach that examines interdependent relationships.
To reduce the impact of climate change on forest wildlife and habitat, forest managers need the latest scientific information when updating their management plans and strategies. Defenders of Wildlife reviewed 11 recent reports on climate science, impacts and vulnerability of terrestrial, freshwater and marine wildlife and habitats. Here, we have compiled the key findings for U.S. Forest Service leaders and staff and members of the public interested in helping vulnerable species and landscapes survive the changes ahead.
Gray Wolf, © Fred C. Bicksler
A federal judge has reinstated federal protections for wolves in Wyoming on the grounds that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did not ensure that the state’s wolf management plan was enforceable as required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Here’s what the decision means for wolves and the ESA.

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