Wyden’s Logging Bill Slashes Forests and Guts Protections for Endangered Species

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WASHINGTON (December 9, 2013) – Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chair Ron Wyden today introduced a logging bill that, in its current form, would bulldoze bedrock environmental laws to pave the way for dramatic increases in logging. The bill would affect management of over two million acres of federal forest lands in Oregon known as the Oregon & California, or, “O&C,” lands.

The following is a statement from Jamie Rappaport Clark, President and CEO, Defenders of Wildlife:

“Senator Wyden repeatedly promised that his logging bill would not undermine bedrock federal environmental laws, and yet it does just that. As written, the bill strips endangered species of legal protections while green lighting accelerated logging levels in Oregon forests that are critical to imperiled wildlife, watersheds and sustainable businesses.”

“When so many in Congress seem bent on casting aside our nation’s foremost environmental laws, we were looking to Senator Wyden’s legislation as a beacon of reason. Unfortunately this bill seriously undermines the Endangered Species Act on its 40th anniversary and, if passed, will have extremely serious consequences for our land, water and wildlife on over two million acres of public forests.”

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Contact: Courtney Sexton, csexton@defenders.org, 202.772.0253

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With more than 1 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit www.defenders.org and follow us on Twitter @DefendersNews.

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