Sam Hamilton confirmed as new director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Defenders of Wildlife is optimistic about the choice

(07/31/2009) -


  • 30-year Fish and Wildlife Service veteran Sam Hamilton confirmed as director of the agency today
  • Former FWS director Jamie Rappaport Clark says Sam Hamilton is a sensible choice for the position
  • Defenders of Wildlife looks forward to working with FWS

WASHINGTON — Jamie Rappaport Clark, former director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and executive vice president for Defenders of Wildlife, believes that Sam Hamilton has what it takes to revitalize the service.

“Over his 30 years with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sam Hamilton has shown a strong knowledge of how to work with communities, stakeholders and politics to successfully protect sensitive species and reasonably manage our nation’s fish and wildlife and their habitats.

“With the impacts of global warming threatening wildlife refuges across the nation and the challenges of bringing endangered species back from the brink of extinction, Sam Hamilton has his work cut out for him. But Defenders of Wildlife is confident that Mr. Hamilton brings the right combination of experience and integrity to the job.

“We look forward to working with the director to begin a new era of strong, science-based conservation and protection not only for our nation’s most imperiled fish, plants and wildlife, but also our natural resources legacy to be enjoyed by future generations.”

Learn more about Defenders work on wildlife conservation.
Visit the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Web site.


Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With more than 1 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit



James Navarro, (202) 772-0247

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