Oil Spill Commission final report outlines industry-wide safety lapses

Action on oil spill legislation needed in Congress


  • The “Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling” today presented the results of its comprehensive, nonpartisan investigation of the worst environmental disaster in American history.
  • According to the report, the missteps and safety lapses that precipitated the Deepwater Horizon blowout are systemic and industry-wide.
  • Congress has yet to take legislative action in response to the BP Deepwater Horizon Gulf oil disaster, to ensure that this risky industry operates in the future in the context of our national interest and accepts full financial liability for its mistakes.
WASHINGTON (01/11/2011) -

The following is a statement from Richard Charter, offshore drilling expert and senior policy advisor for marine programs for Defenders of Wildlife:

“The well-researched findings issued today chronicle the shortcuts and flawed drilling industry practices that led to the BP Deepwater Horizon Gulf oil disaster and even now threaten other coasts. But a report cannot, by itself, protect America’s shorelines and regional economies from a repeat of the same disaster.

“Congress must now take legislative action to deal with the persistent environmental and economic impacts of the tragic oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and chart a responsible path focused on alternatives to oil to keep America’s coasts and natural treasures safe.”


Learn more about how Defenders is working to protect American coasts from the threats of offshore drilling


Richard Charter, (707) 875-2345 or (707) 875-3482, waterway@monitor.net
Caitlin Leutwiler, (202) 772-3226, cleutwiler@defenders.org

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