Miller Endangered Species Bill Wins Endorsements From Environmental, Religious, & Sportsmen's Groups

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(07/30/1997) - Washington, D.C. - Today America's leading grassroots conservation organizations strongly endorsed the Endangered Species Recovery Act, bipartisan legislation to be introduced tomorrow by Rep. George Miller (D-CA), joined by Rep. Connie Morella (R-MD), Rep. Christopher Shays (R-CT), and a number of other Members of Congress.

The bill earned the enthusiastic backing of many organizations, notably the Endangered Species Coalition, whose 260-member groups include religious and sportsmen's organizations as well as national and grassroots environmental groups.

Brock Evans, executive director of the coalition, said today, "At last Americans who want to do something pro-active to protect our diminishing wildlife have legislation they can support. For too many years, those politicians and interests who have wanted to weaken wildlife protections have tried to put us on the defensive. Now Congressman Miller has provided a positive model of what can be done. His bill shows that it is possible to simultaneously accomplish two goals: to protect our rich biological heritage according to the best scientific principles and to assist landowners who want to do the right thing."

The groups endorsing the bill are diverse. Leaders include Defenders of Wildlife, Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund (formerly Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund), Grassroots Environmental Effectiveness Network, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Northwest Ecosystem Alliance, the Sierra Club, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group, and The Wilderness Society.

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Contact(s):

Cat Lazaroff, (202) 772-3270

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