Idaho jeopardizes wolf recovery with aggressive proposal

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State to allow trapping and no-quota wolf hunting

BOISE, Idaho (07/08/2011) -

Idaho Fish and Game released today its proposed guidelines and quota for hunting wolves this fall. The proposal includes no quotas across most of the state, allowing an indefinite number of wolves to be killed with valid hunting permits. According to proposal, the state would only enforce a hunting quota along certain parts of the Idaho-Montana border, and trapping will be allowed to further reduce wolf numbers.

The following is a statement from Suzanne Stone, Northern Rockies representative for Defenders of Wildlife:

“We are concerned that the proposal for this year’s hunting season would allow too many wolves to be killed. There are far fewer wolves than bears, mountain lions or elk in Idaho. Allowing the population to approach only 150 wolves is unsustainable and not supported by sound wildlife management principles. Instead, Idaho should manage for a healthy and abundant wolf population.

“Through a collaborative effort, we’ve spent more than 15 years returning wolves to the landscape, where they play an essential role in maintaining healthy, balanced ecosystems. It is shameful that Idaho is now putting that recovery in jeopardy.”

Background:

Wolves were hunted for the first time in 2009 while federal protections were temporarily lifted. During that hunting season, Idaho established a quota of 220 wolves and 188 wolves were killed.

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Links:

Read IDFG’s fall wolf hunt proposal

Learn more about what Defenders is doing to support the ongoing recovery of wolves in the Northern Rockies

Read a chronology of wolf recovery in the Northern Rockies

Contact(s):

John Motsinger, 202-772-0288

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