House votes to block assistance to farmers preparing for droughts, floods and pests

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Summary:

  • The U.S. House of Representatives today passed an amendment to the fiscal 2012 agriculture spending bill that would prohibit the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) from implementing its new departmental regulation on climate change adaptation.
  • The USDA is working to assist the nation’s farmers, agriculture industry and forest managers in developing better farming and forestry practices that create new markets and reduce the negative impacts of climate change and variability.
  • The climate change adaptation policy encourages the integration of climate preparation strategies into the Department’s programs and operations so it can better ensure that taxpayer resources are invested wisely and that the Department’s services and operations remain effective in current and future climate conditions.
WASHINGTON (06/16/2011) -

The following is a statement issued by Jamie Rappaport Clark, executive vice president for Defenders of Wildlife:


“America’s farms, forests and ranchlands not only feed our country, but also help support abundant and diverse wildlife populations. Our food security, property and wildlife heritage are all at risk from increased frequency and severity of heat waves, droughts, floods, fires and pests.


“Rep. Scalise and the 237 other members of the House are inhibiting the USDA’s ability to help farmers and forest owners and managers prepare for a future that includes more of the extreme weather events we have just experienced this spring. The future is not going to be the same as the past. This commonsense USDA policy says let’s plan for that future in a way that will prevent food disruptions, massive forest fires and economic hardships.”

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Links:

Read about Congress’ June 3 vote to put the lives, livelihoods, property and security of Americans at increased risk.


Learn more about the importance of a broad, comprehensive strategy to preparing for the impacts of climate change.

Contact(s):

Caitlin Leutwiler, (202) 772-3226; cleutwiler@defenders.org

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