Great Lakes wolves successfully recovered under Endangered Species Act

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Federal protections lifted based on sustainable populations and solid state management plans

WASHINGTON (12/21/2011) -

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that it will be removing federal protections for gray wolves in the western Great Lakes, including parts of Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan.

The following is a statement from Jamie Rappaport Clark, president of Defenders of Wildlife:

“The successful recovery of wolves in the western Great Lakes shows that our nation’s wildlife conservation tools really do work. The incredible comeback of wolves in the region is a testament to the effectiveness of the Endangered Species Act and the dedication of wolf advocates, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and state wildlife managers. By working toward a common goal, we have been able to restore wolves across the western Great Lakes landscape and protect America’s natural heritage for generations to come. We urge the states to continue managing wolves in a way that sustains their essential ecological role while working proactively with nonlethal measures to reduce conflicts with livestock and other animals before they arise.  

“The recovery of wolves in the Great Lakes is a reminder of our nation’s great conservation legacy and a major victory that all Americans can be proud of.”

 

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Links:

Read more about what Defenders has done to protect wolves in the Great Lakes

Read an op-ed from Defenders’ President Jamie Rappaport Clark in the Madison Capital Times

Read a Q&A about the delisting decision from USFWS

Contact(s):

John Motsinger, 202-772-0288

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