Gov. Otter approves ‘emergency’ amid wolf hysteria

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Idaho discards science, panders to anti-wolf extremists in new chapter of wolf management

BOISE, Idaho (04/20/2011) -

Idaho Gov. “Butch” Otter approved legislation (House Bill 343) yesterday that directs him to issue an executive order declaring a statewide wolf “disaster emergency.”

The following is a statement from Suzanne Stone, Northern Rockies representative for Defenders of Wildlife:

“Is this what state management of wolves is going to look like? By authorizing a wolf ‘emergency,’ Governor Otter is pandering to the anti-wolf crowd and reinforcing ridiculous falsehoods about wolves. He is setting the tone for wolf management based on unjustified hysteria rather than sound science. We need our leaders to focus on resolving conflicts, not perpetuating them.

“The truth is we have about 700 wolves in Idaho right now. That’s almost 20 percent less than we had last year, so population growth appears to be leveling off. And not a single person has been injured by a wolf in Idaho since the species was restored 15 years ago.

“Like all wild animals, wolves should be valued for the role they play in our society—they bring in money to communities from ecotourism and maintain a healthy, balanced landscape. But wolves are just one of many predators that have existed in Idaho since long before humans arrived. Idaho has more wilderness area percentage-wise than any other state outside of Alaska. That’s a big part of the reason why most people choose to live here, and wolves are a critical part of that wild character that Idahoans value.”

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Links:

Read the text of House Bill 343

Get the facts about wolves in the Northern Rockies

Read more about what Defenders is doing to protect wolves in the Northern Rockies.

Contact(s):

John Motsinger, 202-772-0288

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