Environmental Protection Agency Introduces Vital New Emissions Regulations

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WASHINGTON (September 20, 2013)–– The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed unprecedented new conservation requirements for coal-burning power plants to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Power plants would have to capture or store 40 percent of their greenhouse gas output. The following is a statement from Defenders of Wildlife President and CEO Jamie Rappaport Clark:

“Climate change is upending the entire natural world. The changes we have already seen in wildlife populations and ecosystems are only the tip of the proverbial iceberg. The changes to come are projected to be unprecedented in the geological record. We simply must limit the greenhouse gas pollution that causes global warming if we are to have a livable planet.

“This new regulation will be an important step forward in reducing the impact of climate change. It’s also a great sign that President Obama is honoring his promise to effectively address climate change in his second term.

“Every pound of carbon dioxide we save counts. The EPA-and the Obama administration- is acting on its duty to protect our land, water and wildlife.”

Contact: Haley McKey, (202)-772-0247, hmckey@defenders.org

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Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With more than 1 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit www.defenders.org/newsroomand follow us on Twitter @DefendersNews.

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