DOI announces plan to revamp endangered species regulations

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Agency outlines improvements for landowner incentives, critical habitat

WASHINGTON (05/26/2011) -

The U.S. Department of the Interior unveiled a preliminary set of proposals today to improve implementation of the Endangered Species Act. The proposals were outlined in response to an Executive Order (E.O. 13563) issued by President Obama in January that calls for federal agencies to review existing regulations “to determine whether any such regulations should be modified, streamlined, expanded, or repealed so as to make the agency’s regulatory program more effective or less burdensome in achieving the regulatory objectives.”

The following is a statement from Jamie Rappaport Clark, executive vice president for Defenders of Wildlife:

“The Endangered Species Act has been the backbone of wildlife conservation for nearly 40 years and continues to be a vital part of protecting imperiled wildlife. While the law has been a tremendous success, we agree that there are important opportunities to make it even more effective. The areas that the Interior Department has identified for review hold promise, including many fresh ideas that will help restore America’s imperiled plants and animals in a more timely fashion. Specifically, improving private landowner tools, making more efficient critical habitat designations, and improving the pesticide consultation process are all worthy goals.

“We are pleased to see that the Interior Department is undertaking this effort, and we look forward to working with the agency to find ways to enhance endangered species conservation and encourage greater participation from landowners, communities and concerned citizens.”

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Links:

Learn more about Interior Department’s plan to revamp the ESA and other regulations

Contact(s):

John Motsinger, 202-772-0288

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