California Dreaming: Lone wolf entering California marks historic conservation success

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WASHINGTON (12/30/2011) - A lone dispersing wolf from Oregon, known as OR7, has crossed the border into northern California.

The following is a statement from Jamie Rappaport Clark, president of Defenders of Wildlife:

“I can’t think of a better way to ring in the New Year than celebrating this incredible conservation success. The return of the gray wolf to California represents more than two decades of hard work by wildlife advocates and state and federal wildlife managers to bring this magnificent animal back from the brink of extinction. We also owe our thanks to the millions of Americans who gave their support along the way. However, there is much more work to be done to ensure that breeding packs can become established and accepted as part of California's natural heritage. Defenders of Wildlife has been honored to help turn the dream of wolf recovery into a reality. Now, we stand ready to help the people of California learn how to safely coexist with wolves in this important part of their historic range.”

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Links:

Learn more about OR7 from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Read a press release from California Department of Fish and Game

See what Defenders is doing to pave the way for wolf recovery across the West

Get weekly wolf news on Defenders blog

Contact(s):

John Motsinger, 202-772-0288

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