Calif. Assembly Committee Passes Non-lead Ammo Bill

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California Assembly Committee Passes Bill Requiring Non-Lead Ammo for all Hunting
Measure Seeks to Reduce Lead Poisoning of Wildlife and Humans


Sacramento, CA (April 16, 2013) — The Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee of the California Assembly passed a bill today that requires hunters in the state to use non-lead ammunition. The goal is to reduce the amount of lead in the environment and prevent wildlife and humans from being poisoned by the toxic metal. Below is a statement from Kim Delfino, California program director for Defenders of Wildlife.

“We’re one step closer to success when it comes to protecting wildlife and human health from the toxic effects of lead ammunition. The passage of today’s bill means California is on its way to be the first state to require the use of non-lead ammunition for all hunting.

“Lead is a known toxin that we have already removed from everything from paint to gasoline to pencils to pipes. Fifty years of scientific research has shown that the presence of lead in the environment poses an ongoing threat to the health of the general public and the viability of the state’s wildlife, including the California condor, bald eagle and golden eagle. It only takes a tiny amount of lead ingested by birds and animals scavenging the remains of a shot animal to cause a horrible death. And, it only takes a tiny amount of lead in game meat to cause lead levels in humans to exceed health and safety thresholds.

“There is no reason to keep using lead ammunition in hunting since there are inexpensive non-lead ammunition alternatives. We are pleased that a majority of the members of the California Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee listened to the facts and agreed that it is time to get the lead out of ammunition.”

 

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With more than 1 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit www.defenders.organd follow us on Twitter @DefendersNews.

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