Defenders in the Northwest
Sage-Grouse, Photo: USFWS Pacific Southwest Region

Key Accomplishments

For more than 30 years, the Defenders of Wildlife Northwest team has been working on the state and national levels to protect wildlife and the habitat they depend on.

  • In 1998, Defenders began working with ranchers to reduce livestock losses to wolves. The Wood River Wolf Project, started in 2008 to pilot nonlethal deterrents and other methods of reducing conflict between wolves and livestock, has proven to be a phenomenal demonstration of these efforts. 
  • Served as an active participant in the development of strong state wolf management plans in both Oregon and Washington which guide non-federal recovery actions in those states.
  • Initiated and supported legislation that improved the effectiveness of Oregon state programs for voluntary conservation.
  • Secured protection for almost 23,000 acres of endangered shrub steppe habitat in the Columbia Basin through negotiated settlement with the State of Oregon, agribusiness interests and environmental litigants.
  • Helped establish a dedicated source of conservation funding (through the lottery, Measure 66) in Oregon that has generated more than $300 million for state investments in habitat conservation and watershed improvements.
  • Spearheaded the Oregon Biodiversity Project, a collaborative biodiversity assessment that produced one of the nation’s first statewide conservation strategies and provided a model for the state wildlife action plans completed nationwide in 2005.
  • Helped launch the “Watchable Wildlife” Program that led to the publication of wildlife viewing guides in most states and the designation of over 1,000 wildlife viewing sites.


More on Defenders in the Northwest: Meet Our Team »

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