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Defenders In the News

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June 10, 2014

On June 4, after a two year dispute between the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and a coalition of conservation organizations and fishing groups, an agreement was finally reached to set reasonable no-spray buffer zones to protect salmon from five harmful insecticides: diazinon, chlorpyrifos, malathion, carbaryl, and methomyl.

June 4, 2014

Seattle, WA — A coalition of advocates for alternatives to pesticides, conservation organizations, and fishing groups have reached a significant agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The agreement restores reasonable no-spray buffer zones to protect salmon and steelhead from five broad-spectrum insect killers – diazinon, chlorpyrifos, malathion, carbaryl, and methomyl.

June 3, 2014

Conservation and food safety groups filed a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency today for failing to protect endangered species from a new, toxic pesticide called cyantraniliprole. EPA risked far-reaching harm to both aquatic and terrestrial species by approving the widespread use of this new pesticide in January without input from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife and National Marine Fisheries services.

June 3, 2014
Wolf, © Larry Travis

A national wildlife conservation group is taking aim at Idaho Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter's wolf policy. In a two-week ad campaign, Defenders of Wildlife hopes to reach out to Idaho voters and political leaders to rethink what the organization is calling a "statewide war on gray wolves." The radio ads, which feature Idahoans expressing concern about the state's wolf population, will air in the Boise and Spokane media markets over the next two weeks.

June 2, 2014

Although Florida lawmakers had more than a $1.2 billion surplus to use in the new state budget, environmental groups say the 2014 Legislature shorted conservation efforts in several critical areas, including the protection and restoration of state springs.

May 30, 2014
Gray Wolf, © Angelique Rea

Wolves have been facing a barrage of undue negative publicity lately, from being stripped of federal protection to being prized in glorified wolf-hunting derbies to being victims of state bills that fund their widespread killing under the guise of “management.” In the latest affront to these creatures, Animal Planet featured a segment called “Man-Eating Super Wolves” during their Monster Week line up, prompting sharp public criticism. Defenders of Wildlife and other concerned citizens called on the television station to immediately remove the program from the air.

May 29, 2014

“So much for corporate responsibility,” said Jason Rylander, senior attorney with Defenders of Wildlife. “Now that both EPA and the state of California have moved to curb the use of d-Con and other risky poisons, Reckitt Benckiser needs to do the right thing and stop fighting these common-sense measures to stop accidental poisonings.”

May 28, 2014
Photo: Joel Sartore

Nearly 20 years ago, I served on the team that carefully captured and released the first wolves in Idaho and Yellowstone National Park. Though this reintroduction effort was heralded internationally as a significant American achievement in the recovery of endangered species, we’re in a far different place today, and especially in Idaho.

May 27, 2014

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is considering new rules for managing the development of private, state or tribally owned mineral interests within the national refuge system, prompting concerns from officials in Alaska who say it flies in the face of existing laws.

May 23, 2014
Florida Panther,  © SuperStock

VENUS — In a move that has never been tried before by the federal government, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials want to pay big landowners to maintain their property as good panther habitat.

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