Mexican 
Gray Wolves by the Numbers

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Mexican Gray Wolves by the Numbers

The numbers are in and they’re disappointing, says Eva Sargent, Defenders’ Southwest director. The population expanded by only eight individuals from the 2012 year-end population of 75 wolves.

“This is not unexpected, given the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has left them without a guiding recovery plan, and that leaves these wolves geographically and genetically stranded,” says Sargent. “These wolves need three things: a science-based recovery plan implemented immediately, more breeding pairs released into the wild, and at least two additional, established core populations if they are to survive.”

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