Defenders Magazine

Spring 2010

Volume 85, Issue 2

Feature

The mid-January snowstorm cleared off overnight. By morning, the temperature had plunged to minus 25 F, and the mountain valley around me was muttering about the cold. Sap deep inside the pine and fir trees had started to freeze hard, making the woodlands creak and pop. The lakes banged and whoomped as their ice cover expanded. Even the air felt brittle, scraping the inside of my throat as I skied hard toward the valley's upper end. I was tracking the male wolverine we called M1. His big paw prints were fresh. He must have come through at dawn. But where was he bound? There was nothing before him but a sheer headwall whose rim marked the Continental Divide, where the snows were far deeper and the temperatures lower yet.

Articles

The drive to produce biofuels adds to the pressures on vulnerable prairie chickens
Freshwater mussels may not be cute, but we can’t afford to ignore them
The first Earth Day was conceived by the late Senator Gaylord Nelson as a day of learning. In response, schools nationwide organized environmental “teach-ins.”
Sad record was set in Florida last year: the most manatee deaths—429—ever in state waters.
Last year saw a record-high 17 deaths of the endangered big cats on Florida roadways—with one of these still under investigation. In 2008, 10 panthers were killed by vehicles.
Last year saw a record-high 17 deaths of the endangered big cats on Florida roadways—with one of these still under investigation. In 2008, 10 panthers were killed by vehicles.
EPA Upholds Pesticide Ban—Lions Still Imperiled; North Carolina Bridge Goes Nowhere; Defenders Sues to Protect Water and Wildlife; Defenders Receives Nature’s Path Award
This is the heart of wolf country in the West, a place where Defenders of Wildlife is helping ranchers keep both their flocks and resident wolves safe.
Its name may sound silly, but the bobolink is a serious songster—and a world-class traveler. These dark birds sail the night skies, migrating to grasslands, hayfields and meadows in North and South America—a round trip that’s about 12,500 miles long.
Dwelling high in western mountains, American pikas bear little resemblance to their closest cousin—the rabbit.
Like wildebeest on the Serengeti or salmon in the Pacific Northwest, monarch butterflies take part in an epic migration.
With its eight arms you might say an octopus is “handy,” but handy with a tool?
Jaguars may finally get the protection they deserve in the American Southwest now that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has agreed to create a recovery plan for the imperiled felines.