Defenders Magazine

Fall 2009

Volume 84, Issue 4

Feature

It’s 10:35 a.m. on an April day at the headquarters of Big Cypress National Preserve in Florida. A woman in a gray uniform is busy dispatching personnel to the scene of a car accident in the preserve that occurred just moments before I walk in the door. The last thing I hear before being ushered from the room: “Please god, let it turn out to be a dog and not a panther.”

Articles

On a remote island in the Great Lakes, wolves and moose struggle against global warming's effects
Scientists try to get a grip on one of America’s least-abundant and most colorful shorebirds
The winds of change have been blowing strong in Washington since last year’s election. Nowhere is this more evident than in the tackling of the problem of global warming.
There Oughta Be More Otters; As the World Warms; Original Twittering Still Popular; Expecting to Fly
The America’s Wildlife Heritage Act aims to ensure that the government manages national forests and other public lands by making the health of ecosystems a priority.
The America’s Wildlife Heritage Act aims to ensure that the government manages national forests and other public lands by making the health of ecosystems a priority.
In a fresh start for forests, a federal court in June overturned the Bush administration’s last-ditch effort to weaken protections for wildlife on the country’s 175 national forests and grasslands.
It took more than two decades and more than a million federal dollars to bring gray wolves back from the brink in the lower 48 states.
Feeling the Heat with Jeff Corwin; Victory for California Wildlife; Throwing a Brick at the Wall
Alexandra Siess finished a hard day’s work retrieving nets used to catch and then count, measure, tag and release diamondback terrapins in the Chesapeake Bay
It’s topsy-turvy—California’s Mojave Desert—a place where sheep prefer rocky cliffs over grassy fields.
Is it possible that the red-throated loon could still tell us something about a changing climate?