Habitat Conservation

When habitats are threatened, so are the animals who live there.

Washington Wildlife Commission Approves Wolf Recovery Plan

State will manage for long-term, sustainable wolf population

OLYMPIA, Wash. (12/05/2011) -

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission approved the state’s final wolf recovery plan on Saturday, charting a course toward the long-term sustainability of its growing wolf population.

The following is a statement from Suzanne Stone, Northern Rockies representative for Defenders of Wildlife:

The Number One Threat to Wildlife

Item Type: 
Climate Change
Billboard Image: 
Polar Bear, © Paul Nicklen / National Geographic Stock
Teaser Image: 

Wolverine

Item Type: 
Species at Risk
Billboard Image: 
Wolverine, © Paul Nicklen / National Geographic Stock
Teaser Image: 
Wolverine, © Paul Nicklen / National Geographic Stock

DOI endorses bad Wyoming wolf plan

USFWS pursues premature delisting based on inadequate state management plan

Summary:

Yellowstone bison may find new tribal homes

Relocation plan could help Montana tribes restore conservation herds

Summary:

Sea Turtles

Title for Lists: 
Sea Turtles
Type of Fact Sheet: 
Animals
Banner Subtitle: 
Fact Sheet
Banner Image 1 (smaller, top): 
Green Sea Turtle, © Robert Wintner DPC
Teaser Image: 
Loggerhead Turtle, Brian J. Skerry / National Geographic Stock
Item Type: 
Fact Sheet
Protection Status (Endangered Species Act): 
endangered

Endangered Species Act (ESA): five species of sea turtle (Green, Leatherback, Hawksbill, Kemp’s Ridley, and Pacific or Olive Ridley) are listened as endangered, which means they are in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. One species (Loggerhead) is listed as threatened, which means it is likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.

Protection Status (IUCN Red List): 
critically-endangered
Drop-down Listing: 
Sea Turtles

The Hawksbill, Atlantic Ridley, and Leatherback sea turtles are listed as critically endangered, which indicates that they are facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild.  The Loggerhead and Green Sea Turtle are listed as endangered, which means they are considered to be facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild. The Pacific or Olive Ridley is listed as vulnerable., which means the probability of its extinction during the next 20 years is at least 10%.

Fast Facts: 

Size: Kemp's Ridley is the smallest sea turtle at 30 inches long (.762m). The largest sea turtle is the leatherback - an adult can reach over six and a half feet long (over 1.8m). Adult female and male sea turtles are the same size.

Weight: Kemp's Ridley weighs between 80-100lbs (36-45 kg). Leatherback can weigh over 2,000 pounds (over 907 kg)

Lifespan: Up to 80 years.

Sea turtles are found in warm and temperate waters throughout the world and migrate hundreds of miles between nesting and feeding grounds. Most sea turtles undergo long migrations, some as far as 1400 miles, between their feeding grounds and the beaches where they nest.

Burrowing Owl

Title for Lists: 
Burrowing Owl
Type of Fact Sheet: 
Animals
Banner Subtitle: 
Fact Sheet
Banner Image 1 (smaller, top): 
Burrowing Owl, © Pat Ulrich
Teaser Image: 
Burrowing Owl, © Scott Anderson
Item Type: 
Fact Sheet
Protection Status (Endangered Species Act): 
not_listed

The burrowing owl is endangered in Canada, threatened in Mexico, and a species of special concern in Florida and most of the western USA. It is a state-endangered species in Colorado. Burrowing owls are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act in Canada, the United States, and Mexico.

Drop-down Listing: 
Burrowing Owl
Fast Facts: 

Height: About 10 inches.
Weight: Average is about 6 ounces.
Unlike most owls in which the female is larger than the male, the sexes of the burrowing owl are the same size.

Burrowing owls are distributed from the Mississippi to the Pacific and from the Canadian prairie provinces into South America. They are also found in Florida and the Caribbean islands. Burrowing owls have disappeared from much of their historic range.

Bald Eagle

Title for Lists: 
Bald Eagle
Type of Fact Sheet: 
Animals
Banner Subtitle: 
Fact Sheet
Banner Image 1 (smaller, top): 
Bald Eagle, © Douglas Brown
Teaser Image: 
Bald Eagle, © Pam Mullins
Item Type: 
Fact Sheet

Since their removal from the Endangered Species Act, bald eagles are primarily protected under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and its implementing regulations prohibit the take of bald eagles, which includes activities that are likely to interfere with eagles’ breeding, feeding or sheltering behavior, or result in injury, death, or nest abandonment.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act further protects bald eagles and their eggs, nests and feathers by prohibiting killing, taking, or possession of eagles without a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In some states, bald eagles are also protected by state endangered species laws.

Drop-down Listing: 
Bald Eagle
Fast Facts: 

Length: Around 3 feet; males are smaller.
Wingspan: Females around 7 feet; males around 6 feet.
Weight: 10-14 lbs.
Lifespan: 20-30 years.

Bald eagles live near bodies of water in Canada and Alaska, and in scattered locations all throughout the lower 48 states and Mexico.

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