Habitat Conservation

When habitats are threatened, so are the animals who live there.

Bald Eagle

Title for Lists: 
Bald Eagle
Type of Fact Sheet: 
Animals
Banner Subtitle: 
Fact Sheet
Banner Image 1 (smaller, top): 
Bald Eagle, © Douglas Brown
Teaser Image: 
Bald Eagle, © Pam Mullins
Item Type: 
Fact Sheet

Since their removal from the Endangered Species Act, bald eagles are primarily protected under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and its implementing regulations prohibit the take of bald eagles, which includes activities that are likely to interfere with eagles’ breeding, feeding or sheltering behavior, or result in injury, death, or nest abandonment.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act further protects bald eagles and their eggs, nests and feathers by prohibiting killing, taking, or possession of eagles without a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In some states, bald eagles are also protected by state endangered species laws.

Drop-down Listing: 
Bald Eagle
Fast Facts: 

Length: Around 3 feet; males are smaller.
Wingspan: Females around 7 feet; males around 6 feet.
Weight: 10-14 lbs.
Lifespan: 20-30 years.

Bald eagles live near bodies of water in Canada and Alaska, and in scattered locations all throughout the lower 48 states and Mexico.

In the Field: (Prairie) Dog Days Of Summer

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Defenders team makes the trek to Thunder Basin to relocate prairie dogs for second year in a row.

Controversial solar power plant challenged by conservation groups

Conservation groups urge Interior Department to move the Calico Solar Project to less sensitive lands

Washington (08/25/2011) -

A coalition of conservation groups made a last-ditch appeal to Interior Secretary Ken Salazar today, urging the Bureau of Land Management to move the Calico Solar Project from vital desert habitat to degraded lands that could produce the same amount of energy, but pose less risk to imperiled wildlife and the environment.

Sea otter conservation coalition endorses renewal of U.S. Fish and Wildlife's effort to recover California's southern sea otter

Feds Propose to End the No-Otter Zone

MONTEREY, Calif. (08/17/2011) - A coalition of organizations welcomed news that California’s struggling sea otters may soon get a big boost thanks to a draft plan released by federal wildlife officials today that would end a controversial “no-otter” zone on the California coast and allow the marine mammals to re-colonize their traditional habitat.

Interior Department takes steps to accelerate climate change

Legal Action Precedes August 17th Coal Sale in Powder River Basin of Wyoming

Power River Basin of Wyoming and Montana (08/16/2011) -

A coalition of conservation groups today stepped up efforts to safeguard the climate from dirty energy, filing suit against the U.S. Bureau of Land Management over its approval of more than 350 million tons of new coal mining in the Powder River Basin of northeastern Wyoming.

Statement on Settlement Agreement Between National Environmental Organizations and Solar Development Companies Regarding San Luis Obispo Solar Projects

Governor Brown Commends Agreement

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (08/09/2011) -

Sierra Club, Defenders of Wildlife and Center for Biological Diversity issued a statement today with SunPower Corp. (NASDAQ: SPWRA, SPWRB) and Topaz Solar Farms, LLC, a subsidiary of First Solar, Inc. (NASDAQ: FSLR), on a settlement agreement regarding two solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant projects in development in San Luis Obispo County, Calif.

DOI releases details of Wyoming shoot-on-sight wolf plan

Wolves to be targeted as unwanted predators for most of the year

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (08/03/2011) -

The U.S. Department of the Interior released more details today about its agreement with Wyoming on a wolf management plan that would allow wolves to be shot on sight across most of the state for most of the year. Under the plan, wolves would only have a reprieve in a small northwest corner of the state, but even there they could be hunted with a license.

Idaho commission approves 2011 wolf hunting and trapping seasons

Hunting and trapping to commence this fall

SALMON, Idaho (07/28/2011) -

The Idaho Fish & Game Commission approved today a proposal allowing hunting throughout the state and trapping in five wolf management units. There will be no hunt quotas across a majority of hunting zones.

The following is a statement from Suzanne Stone, Northern Rockies representative for Defenders of Wildlife:

Idaho jeopardizes wolf recovery with aggressive proposal

State to allow trapping and no-quota wolf hunting

BOISE, Idaho (07/08/2011) -

Idaho Fish and Game released today its proposed guidelines and quota for hunting wolves this fall. The proposal includes no quotas across most of the state, allowing an indefinite number of wolves to be killed with valid hunting permits. According to proposal, the state would only enforce a hunting quota along certain parts of the Idaho-Montana border, and trapping will be allowed to further reduce wolf numbers.

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