Habitat Conservation

When habitats are threatened, so are the animals who live there.

Sonoran Pronghorn

Title for Lists: 
Sonoran Pronghorn
Type of Fact Sheet: 
Animals
Banner Subtitle: 
Fact Sheet
Teaser Image: 
Sonoran Pronghorn, © Mark C. Milburn
Item Type: 
Fact Sheet
Protection Status (Endangered Species Act): 
endangered

The Sonoran pronghorn has been listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) since 1967. This listing means that they are in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their range.

Drop-down Listing: 
Sonoran Pronghorn
Fast Facts: 

Scientific name: Antilocapra americana sonoriensis
Height: About 3 feet at shoulders
Length: 4.3-4.8 feet from head to tail
Weight: Males 100-130 lbs.; females 75-100 lbs.
Top speed: Up to 60 miles per hour
Lifespan: 10-12 years

Sonoran Pronghoen Range Map

Sea Turtles

Title for Lists: 
Sea Turtles
Type of Fact Sheet: 
Animals
Banner Subtitle: 
Fact Sheet
Banner Image 1 (smaller, top): 
Green Sea Turtle, © Robert Wintner DPC
Teaser Image: 
Sea Turtle, © Christina Albright-Mundy
Item Type: 
Fact Sheet
Protection Status (Endangered Species Act): 
endangered

Endangered Species Act (ESA): five species of sea turtle (Green, Leatherback, Hawksbill, Kemp’s Ridley, and Pacific or Olive Ridley) are listened as endangered, which means they are in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. One species (Loggerhead) is listed as threatened, which means it is likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.

Protection Status (IUCN Red List): 
critically-endangered
Drop-down Listing: 
Sea Turtles

The Hawksbill, Atlantic Ridley, and Leatherback sea turtles are listed as critically endangered, which indicates that they are facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild.  The Loggerhead and Green Sea Turtle are listed as endangered, which means they are considered to be facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild. The Pacific or Olive Ridley is listed as vulnerable., which means the probability of its extinction during the next 20 years is at least 10%.

Fast Facts: 

Size: Kemp's Ridley is the smallest sea turtle at 30 inches long (.762m). The largest sea turtle is the leatherback - an adult can reach over six and a half feet long (over 1.8m). Adult female and male sea turtles are the same size.

Weight: Kemp's Ridley weighs between 80-100lbs (36-45 kg). Leatherback can weigh over 2,000 pounds (over 907 kg)

Lifespan: Up to 80 years.

Sea turtles are found in warm and temperate waters throughout the world and migrate hundreds of miles between nesting and feeding grounds. Most sea turtles undergo long migrations, some as far as 1400 miles, between their feeding grounds and the beaches where they nest.

Black-Footed Ferret

Title for Lists: 
Black-Footed Ferret
Type of Fact Sheet: 
Animals
Banner Subtitle: 
Fact Sheet

Thanks to the Endangered Species Act, these masked mammals are making a comeback, with approximately 750 black-footed ferrets in the wild.

Banner Image 1 (smaller, top): 
Black Footed Ferret, Photo: U.S. Geological Survey
Teaser Image: 
Black Footed Ferret, © Mike Lockhart
Item Type: 
Fact Sheet
Featured Publications: 
Protection Status (Endangered Species Act): 
endangered

Almost all populations of black-footed ferrets except those listed as non-essential experimental populations are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, meaning they are in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.

Protection Status (IUCN Red List): 
endangered

The black-footed ferret is listed as endangered, meaning it is considered to be facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild.

Fast Facts: 

Height: 6 inches
Length: 18-24 inches (including a 5-6 inch tail)
Weight: 1.5-2.5 lbs; males slightly larger than females
Lifespan: 3-4 years in the wild; 8-9 years in captivity

Black-footed ferrets were once found on black-tailed prairie dog colonies across the Great Plains from southern Canada to northern Mexico, and on white-tailed and Gunnison’s prairie dog colonies across the intermountain west. By 1986 they were completely gone from the wild. Today, they have been reintroduced to 15 locations within their former range in Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Kansas and Chihuahua, Mexico (2008).

Bald Eagle

Title for Lists: 
Bald Eagle
Type of Fact Sheet: 
Animals
Banner Subtitle: 
Fact Sheet
Banner Image 1 (smaller, top): 
Bald Eagle, © Pam Mullins
Teaser Image: 
Bald Eagle, © Douglas Brown
Item Type: 
Fact Sheet

Since their removal from the Endangered Species Act, bald eagles are primarily protected under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and its implementing regulations prohibit the take of bald eagles, which includes activities that are likely to interfere with eagles’ breeding, feeding or sheltering behavior, or result in injury, death, or nest abandonment.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act further protects bald eagles and their eggs, nests and feathers by prohibiting killing, taking, or possession of eagles without a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In some states, bald eagles are also protected by state endangered species laws.

Drop-down Listing: 
Bald Eagle
Fast Facts: 

Length: Around 3 feet; males are smaller.
Wingspan: Females around 7 feet; males around 6 feet.
Weight: 10-14 lbs.
Lifespan: 20-30 years.

Bald eagles live near bodies of water in Canada and Alaska, and in scattered locations all throughout the lower 48 states and Mexico.

Climate Change

Title for Lists: 
Climate Change

It's the single greatest threat facing wildlife today. Find out what Defenders is doing—and what you can do to help.

Banner Image 1 (smaller, top): 
Coral reef, © Jim Maragos/USFWS
Teaser Image: 
Polar bear, © Tom Schneider
Item Type: 
Conservation Issue

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