Habitat Conservation

When habitats are threatened, so are the animals who live there.

It’s Another Banner Year at the Cape Hatteras National Seashore!

Cape Hatteras National Seashore is one of our nation’s treasures. It’s a place where people can enjoy the beach and wildlife can safely live and raise their young. But it wasn’t always this way.

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Saving the Sacred Santa Ritas

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Jaguar, © Douglas Trent
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by Courtney Sexton

A proposed mining project in the Santa Rita Mountains would involve a mile-wide, half mile-deep open pit mine that would cause great damage to habitat for many imperiled species, and dump toxic mining waste on national forest land.

The post Saving the Sacred Santa Ritas appeared first on Defenders of Wildlife Blog.

Keep Manatees Safe

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OUTFRONT: A defenders roundup

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Coming to Light 

“Over the past decade, millions of animals have met a grim fate at the hands of a ‘hit-man-for- hire’ arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), which gets away with operating like a private contractor while taxpayers like you and me foot the bill,” says Charlotte Conley, a Defenders’ conservation associate.

Stepping it up for Sage-Grouse

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Reducing ranching hazards in the sagebrush sea

East-central Montana is a beautiful but brutal landscape in December. Wind whips and snow drifts across the rugged, open scrublands. In this harsh climate lives the sage-grouse, a plucky bird that once thrived across the sagebrush sea. Today, however, the population is plummeting from habitat loss. 

Worth Defending: Sonoran Pronghorn

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Sonoran Pronghorn

With an oblong face and a black nose splotch, the Sonoran pronghorn stands out against the cacti-strewn landscape of the American Southwest. It is also one of the rarest of the five subspecies of American pronghorn. Smaller and lighter than its cousins, it shares their ability to blaze across the landscape as fast as 60 miles an hour. But it was never as numerous. This makes their recovery all the more difficult. 

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