Habitat Conservation

When habitats are threatened, so are the animals who live there.

House Proposal Could Wipe Out Sage-Grouse Across Much of the West

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 27, 2015

Contact:
Courtney Sexton, csexton@defenders.org, 202.772.0253
Virginia Cramer, Virginia.cramer@sierraclub.org, 804.519.8449
Elizabeth Heyd, eheyd@nrdc.org , 202.289.2424

House Proposal Could Wipe Out Sage-Grouse Across Much of the West

New Study Documents Continued Sage-Grouse Population Declines

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 24, 2015

Contact: Courtney Sexton, csexton@defenders.org, 202.772.0253

New Study Documents Continued Sage-Grouse Population Declines

Bird on the brink remains imperiled in face of inadequate conservation plans

Florida Panhandle

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Florida Panhandle
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Focal Landscape
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Fact Sheet
Banner Image 1 (smaller, top): 
Gopher tortoise, © Cindy McIntyre
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Florida Panhandle (Apalachicola National Forest), © Julie Tew
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Fact Sheet

Living Lightly

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In the Magazine
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Bee Basics for Your Backyard

Worth Defending: Gunnison sage-grouse

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In the Magazine
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Gunnison sage-grouse,  © Joel SartoreA distinctive “swish-swish-pop-gurgle-pop!” rises from the sagebrush and a normally cautious bird transforms itself in a flash of fanned tail feathers, puffed chest, fluttering wings and flirty dance moves. It’s Gunnison sage-grouse mating season. 

Defenders View

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In the Magazine
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Defenders President Jamie Rappaport Clark, © Krista Schlyer

The Pollinator Predicament

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In the Magazine
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Gene Brandi raises thousands of honeybees 
in California’s Central Valley, the agricultural engine for much of the nation’s produce. Each February and March, his bees are among the 1.7 million rented colonies that swarm over the valley’s 850,000 acres of almond trees. They descend on the riot of pink blossoms, collecting pollen to provision their nests. In the process, they cross-pollinate the trees, enabling these farmers to grow 80 percent of the world’s almonds. As autumn wanes, some hives naturally go silent, empty, dying back in the chilling air and fading light. When Brandi launched his business in the 1970s, he rarely lost even 5 percent of his bees over the winter. But that changed a decade ago when colony collapse disorder arrived on the scene. One year, he lost almost half. Now he’s averaging 30 percent. It’s not just a California problem. Across the country and the world, many pollinators are in decline or at risk of extinction. It’s a serious issue because forests, prairies, meadows, wetlands, seashores and croplands all depend on a diverse and healthy pollinator community to thrive. Globally, nearly 85 percent of all flowering plants require help from animals to produce seeds and fruit. Without them, neither humans nor wildlife would have as much to eat and as a result the planet’s biodiversity would plummet.

Five Years Later

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On the Blog
Billboard Image: 
pelican, © Krista Schlyer
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Five Years Later: Failing to Learn from an Environmental Tragedy

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by Haley McKey

Five years ago today, an explosion on BP’s Deepwater Horizon oil rig initiated one of the worst environmental disasters of our time. But today lawmakers have doubled down on pushing their dirty energy agenda.

The post Five Years Later: Failing to Learn from an Environmental Tragedy appeared first on Defenders of Wildlife Blog.

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