Habitat Conservation

When habitats are threatened, so are the animals who live there.

A Monumental Issue

Teaser Image: 
Fisher, © John Jacobson / WA Department of Fish and wildlife
Item Type: 
How You Can Help

Taken straight out of a fairytale scene, the Berryessa Snow Mountain region is loved by all who visit its grassy slopes bursting with wildflowers and lakes surrounded by wildlife quietly drinking at the shoreline.

Ecosystem Services

Healthy habitats generate many benefits for humans as well as wildlife. Natural processes create healthy soil, clean and abundant water, fertile crops, and protection from flooding and climate extremes. These benefits we receive from nature are often called ecosystem services.

People also value nature - including the fish, wildlife and plants within it - for many reasons. In addition to providing food, water, clothing and building materials, nature offers cultural and spiritual benefits, recreational opportunities and an endless source of beauty.

Display Dynamic Feature: 
1
Teaser Image: 
Forest, © Mark Kimmet / istockphoto
Item Type: 
Habitat Conservation

Gaining Ground

Item Type: 
On the Blog
Billboard Image: 
Prairie Dogs, © Michelle Thomas
Teaser Image: 
Prairie Dogs, © Michelle Thomas

Saving Sage-grouse from “The Core Problem”

Teaser Image: 
Sage-Grouse, Photo: USFWS Mountain Prairie
Item Type: 
On the Blog

by Courtney Sexton

Unfortunately, and although the Wyoming plan has its merits, key components of the strategy are not in accord with the best available science on sage-grouse and are unlikely to protect sage-grouse from ongoing threats, particularly oil and gas drilling. “In fact, federal agencies and other states should avoid adopting the Wyoming strategy if their goal is to conserve sage-grouse,” says Defenders’ sage-grouse expert, Mark Salvo.

Defenders Report: Trouble for Sage-grouse in Wyoming

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 11, 2014

Contact: Courtney Sexton, csexton@defenders.org, 202-772-0253

Defenders Report: Trouble for Sage-grouse in Wyoming

Wyoming sage-grouse strategy inadequate to protect the species

2014 Farm Bill

Congress reauthorizes the Farm Bill every five years. Defenders is working to guide the rulemaking process and implementation of the 2014 Farm Bill to have the greatest positive impact for conservation. We are advocating for regulations that:

Display Dynamic Feature: 
1
Teaser Image: 
Conservation buffer, © Lynn Betts/USDA NRCS
Item Type: 
Habitat Conservation

Agriculture and the Farm Bill

Eighty percent of threatened and endangered species rely on privately-owned land for their habitat needs. The majority of this land is managed by farmers, ranchers and forest landowners, and the actions taken on those lands have a big impact on the health of ecosystems. This makes policies and programs for private lands, like federal agricultural policy, an extremely important part of our work to protect wildlife.
Display Dynamic Feature: 
1
Teaser Image: 
Conservation buffer, © Lynn Betts/USDA NRCS
Item Type: 
Habitat Conservation

Defenders in Action: BLM Public Lands

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) administers more than 258 million acres of public lands, primarily in the 11 western states and Alaska.
Display Dynamic Feature: 
1
Teaser Image: 
Desert, © Julia Chen
Item Type: 
Habitat Conservation

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Habitat Conservation