Defenders in California

Defenders in Action: Working with Partners

Many conservation challenges are too big for any single organization to tackle alone. Defenders of Wildlife has developed a number of valuable partnerships with conservation groups, industry associations and others to increase the effectiveness of our efforts.

How We're Helping

  • In 2006, Defenders worked with the California Cattlemen’s Association and others to create the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition. The goal of the coalition is the protection of privately owned rangelands in the Central Valleyand inner coast range and all their associated habitats, grasslands, oak woodlands and savannahs, and vernal pools.
  • Defenders is an active participant in the Dinkey Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project on the Sierra National Forest. The project is a partnership with the U.S. Forest Service and other stakeholders to plan and implement forest restoration activities that reduce wildfire risk, enhance fish and wildlife habitats, and maintain and improve water quality.
  • Since 2005, Defenders has been a part of the California Roundtable on Agriculture and the Environment. This collaboration between agricultural interests, federal and state agencies and conservation organizations is focused on finding solutions that benefit farmers and ranchers, while also improving habitat for wildlife and producing cleaner air and water for all. This group has worked together to successfully advocate for increased funding for land conservation and good stewardship practices from the federal government.
  • Defenders' Wildlife Volunteer Corps continues to work on habitat restoration and enhancement projects with wildlife and land management agencies and partner organizations. In 2011, Defenders' volunteer members helped to build artificial burrows for burrowing owls in Sonoma.
More on Defenders in California: Additional Priorities »

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How You Can Help
We’re turning to President Obama to ask him to permanently protect 1.3 million acres of vital desert lands by designating the Sand to Snow, Castle Mountains and the Mojave Trails including the Pisgah Valley as national monuments!
Desert Tortoise, Photo: Justin Ennis / Flickr user Averain
Defenders Event
Attend this public meeting to discuss the future of the Mojave Trails, Sand to Snow and Castle Mountains as national monuments. This is your only chance to tell the Obama administration, in person, how important the California Desert is to you.
Mohave Ground Squirrel, © Dr. Phil Leitner
The Mohave ground squirrel is one of the more elusive animals of the California desert.