Animal and Habitat Fact Sheets

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The swift fox is a small fox around the size of a domestic house cat and found in the western grasslands of North America, such as Colorado, New Mexico and Texas.
The thick-billed parrot is one of only two species of parrot that once inhabited the United States (the other is the Carolina parakeet, which is unfortunately extinct).
The tiger is the largest member of the felid (cat) family. They sport long, thick reddish coats with white bellies and white and black tails. Their heads, bodies, tails and limbs have narrow black, brown or gray stripes.
The vaquita (Phocoena sinus), also known as the Gulf of California harbor porpoise, is is the smallest and rarest of the cetaceans - which include whales, dolphins, and porpoises. Vaquitas are very rarely seen in the wild.
The walrus is a large marine mammal with flippers, a broad head, short muzzle, small eyes, tusks and whiskers. Scientists recognize two subspecies of walrus – the Atlantic walrus and the Pacific walrus.
The western snowy plover is a small wading shorebird with pale brown wings, back, tail and head and white under parts. It has dark patches on either side of the upper breast, dark gray to blackish legs and a black bill.
Wetlands are the link between land and water, and are vital to wildlife, including one-third of endangered species.
Whales belong to the order cetacea, which includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. Whales are divided into two suborders: baleen and toothed whales.
Called "skunk bear" by the Blackfeet Indians, the wolverine is the largest terrestrial member of the weasel family. It has a broad head, small eyes and short rounded ears.
America's own reindeer are one of the most critically endangered mammals in the U.S.

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