Animal Fact Sheets

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The "unicorn of the ocean," the narwhal (Monodon monoceros) is one of the rarest whales in the world. Narwhals are very elusive and mysterious in nature, and is very distinct in appearance due to the large horn-like tusk on its face. The tusk is actually a tooth that grows from the upper jaw of male narwhals.
The North American River Otter is the only river otter found north of Mexico. Its luscious pelt, which was a staple of the French fur trade in the 1700-1800s, has drawn hunters for hundreds of years.
Right whales like the North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) are among the rarest of all marine mammal species. These baleen whales have two separate populations – western and eastern.
Northern fur seals are classified as pinnipeds, a word which is derived from the Latin and means "flap-footed." Native to the northern Pacific Ocean, northern fur seals have the second thickest fur of any animal, second only to the sea otter.
The northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) is one of three subspecies of spotted owl. Like all spotted owls, the northern spotted owl lives in old-growth forests.
Ocelots range in color from light yellow to reddish gray, with dark spots and stripes. They have dark stripes on their cheeks and their tailed have rings of dark fur.
The orca, or "killer whale" is a toothed whale and is the largest member of the dolphin family.
Penguins are aquatic, flightless birds that are highly adapted to life in the water. Their distinct tuxedo-like appearance is called countershading, a form of camouflage that helps keep them safe in the water.
Peregrine falcons are the fastest-flying birds in the world – they are able to dive at 200 miles per hour.
Named for its melodic mating call, the piping plover is a small shorebird. Because they need a very specific habitat to thrive, piping plovers are an indicator species for barrier beaches

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